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March 2021 Newsletter

Foster Closet in Varna, Bulgaria

With your generous help, Lost Sparrows continues to support not only foster families but also other vulnerable children and families by providing them with vital supplies and professional support through our in-country NGO.

Thank you for your continued support! We still need more monthly supporters to reach our $1200/month goal for this project. Your financial support is providing diapers, formula, clothing, toys, therapy assistance, and spiritual encouragement. When donating by check or PayPal, please put ‘Foster Closet’ in the memo or notes.


Nik’s Heart of Hope Grant

We are thrilled to announce that Nik’s Heart of Hope awarded it’s first grant to Wide Awake International. Wide Awake’s vision is the deinstitutionalization of Eastern European’s most marginalized children – those in orphanages and institutions.

One of the ways they are living out their vision is by building duplexes on their property in Ukraine in order to provide family homes for those that can not be reunified with their biological family. Nik is delighted to be providing rocking chairs and a stereo system for the boys that will be living in one of the duplexes.

Nik remembers wishing for more time in the sunshine when he was living in an orphanage in Bulgaria so this has been a very personal project for him.

When he learned of Wide Awake’s needs he knew that the boys needed “rocking chairs for the porch and a music system to sing to Jesus.”

Thank you for all of your support in donating to Nik’s Heart of Hope Fund. We are looking forward to many more projects in the near future that will better the lives of vulnerable children and families.

Please put ‘Niks Heart of Hope’ in the memo or notes when donating via check or PayPal.


Make sure to follow us on Facebook to receive up to date information about upcoming training events!

If you are interested in scheduling Stacey and Darren Gagnon to speak at a trauma-informed training at your school, church, or group, please email Blythe Royaards.


What a beautiful blessing to see signs of Spring and warmer weather approaching! Lost Sparrows started the year off running and we haven’t stopped since. In the last two months, via Zoom, we have had the privilege of offering several free trauma informed trainings for teachers and parents.

We were also able to hold our first in-person event of 2021 in Winona Lake, Indiana, on February 20th for local foster and adoptive families and professionals that work with children from hard places. It was absolutely wonderful seeing the local community support; the businesses below donated generous gifts to bless the families that attended the training. We are excited about the events that we are particiat


The Bear in the Classroom

Trauma Informed Classroom

Excerpt from Ransom from Israel blog post:

Infants and children are wired to need adults in order to survive. Children who have experienced trauma, have been hurt by the very people who were meant to keep them safe. This can lead to negative thinking and shame. A child from a hard place, often has a negative narrative. 

Traumatized kids also tend to develop what Dr. Howard (childmind.org) calls a “hostile attribution bias” — the idea that everyone is out to get them.  “So if a teacher says, ‘Sit down in your seat,” they hear it as, ‘SIT DOWN IN YOUR SEAT!’” she explains. “They hear it as exaggerated and angry and unfair. So they’ll act out really quickly with irritability.” As a teacher, you feel like your tone and words are neutral, they actually hear them as negative. The greater the overreaction to your neutral, the deeper they live within fear and shame.

Children from hard places need tiny successes and to hear that mistakes are stepping stones to learning. They need to be met at their developmental level. You might have an 8th grader who has the cognitive skills of a first grader and an attention span of a preschooler. Adjust your expectations and meet them at their lowest level. You would not expect a preschooler to sit still for an hour and complete a lengthy assignment. Allow for movement and give the child work that is at their cognitive and emotional level.